Not Even Socialists Can Escape Economic Dislocation

Not Even Socialists Can Escape Economic Dislocation

A large section of Tucker Carlson’s criticism of “market capitalism” early this month focused on the impact of economic changes on the American family. “Any economic system that weakens and destroys families is not worth having,” he said. The argument? The loss of manufacturing jobs in the U.S.—jobs traditionally held …

Read More »

The Harder Question Tucker Carlson Raises for Conservatives

The Harder Question Tucker Carlson Raises for Conservatives

Tucker Carlson criticized the “free market system” in his much-discussed Fox News commentary earlier this month. Numerous commentators came immediately to the defense of the “free market system,” criticizing Carlson in return. The sides lined up predictably. More libertarian and libertarian-leaning free market conservatives versus more populist/traditionalist free market critics. …

Read More »

NAFTA’s Effects: A Mexican Perspective

Twenty-Five Years of NAFTA

One of the curious features of the political debates about trade before 1994, when the North American Free Trade Agreement came into force, was that the proposal for a trilateral trade framework was more strongly opposed in the United States and Canada than it was in Mexico. The last-mentioned was …

Read More »

The Left’s Foolish Romance with Mass Protests

The Left’s Foolish Romance with Mass Protests

The Left has had a long romance with mass popular protest, even and sometimes especially protests that break the law. The latest enthusiast is David Leonhardt who lamented yesterday in the New York Times that the resistance has not taken to the streets to try to end the government shutdown. He …

Read More »

NAFTA: Veronique de Rugy’s Response

Twenty-Five Years of NAFTA

I’m pleased that Pierre Lemieux and Roberto Salinas-Leon have no serious quarrels with my overview of the North American Free Trade Agreement’s first 25 years. Unsurprisingly, I in turn have no real quarrel with either of their excellent essays. Matters differ, however, with Julius Krein’s unfavorable response to my favorable …

Read More »

John Marshall, the Dartmouth College Case, and Originalism

John Marshall, the Dartmouth College Case, and Originalism

Two hundred years ago this week, the Supreme Court issued its now famous ruling in Dartmouth College v. Woodward. Writing for the Court, John Marshall defended the independence of Dartmouth College against New Hampshire’s effort to transform its governance, arguing that the school’s charter was protected by the Contracts Clause …

Read More »

Why Supreme Court Judging Is Not Necessarily Partisan

Why Supreme Court Judging Is Not Necessarily Partisan

I recently came upon this review of Richard Brookhiser’s new biography of Chief Justice John Marshall by Yale Professor John Fabian Witt. The review criticizes Brookhiser’s take on Marshall as a justice who furthered the law and originalism rather than politics. Instead, Witt believes that Marshall’s judicial career was defined …

Read More »

Regulating Identity

Regulating Identity

In late October, the Sunday New York Times reported that the Department of Health and Human Services was considering a regulation stating that “Sex means a person’s status as male or female based on immutable biological traits identifiable by or before birth.” According to the leaked document, “The sex listed …

Read More »

Is There a Viable Conservative Alternative to Markets?

Is There a Viable Conservative Alternative to Markets?

Much of the new conservative criticism of markets misses the mark, conflating “modern economy” with “market economy.” However, the key attributes of modern economies exist irrespective whether those economies are organized using markets or not. This matters. When conservatives blame markets for illnesses generic to all modern economies, they misdiagnose …

Read More »